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Tuesday, April 21, 2009

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Lisa at Greenbow

I hear those yellows shouting all over town. Such a joyous noise.

LINDA from EACH LITTLE WORLD

Including in your own garden!

Lynn

I, too, have been seeing mostly yellow and have a pile of pictures for a post-to-be. Better do it before everything changes, and it's happening fast!

Frances

Hi Linda, what wonderful shots of the shouting. Yellow is such an important color in the garden. When the daffs are done here, the lack of yellow is disheartening. There are no other flowers that we have in masses that make that kind of impact any other season, especially when everthing else is brown. Primroses are a favorite, and the epimediums too. Long live yellow!
Frances

LINDA from EACH LITTLE WORLD

Lynn and Frances — I find that there are lots of pink spring flowers which can sometimes get too sweet for me. I realize I've definitely gone for yellow as a response!

Mr. McGregor's Daughter

I used to not like yellow, then I realized it was orange I didn't like. Now I can't seem to get enough pure yellow. Your yellows are so pretty; my favorite is the Marsh Marigold.

jo

There's yellow, and then there's yellow.
Springtime yellow is fresh and hopeful, late summer / autumn yellow is tired and dusty.
Like others I thought I didn't like yellow, but at the moment the 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 yellows out are quite lovely.

It's all in a shade.

LINDA from EACH LITTLE WORLD

Joco — I think you are right about the seasonal differences of yellows. I do have some bright yellow daylilies but they are where I don't really see them, just the folks driving down the street. And I figure they need a jolt of color!

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