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Tuesday, June 25, 2019

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Kristin

They are beautiful! Does the foliage stick around all season? I was contemplating a shady spot in my garden that needs an overhaul just yesterday, and I would love to add these.

Linda Brazill

Yes. The flowers dry into nice seedpods if you leave them. Or sometimes I just cut the flower stalk off. These were all up a few inches to a foot high when we had our last snow in April. Never seems to bother them.

Pat Nylen

I’ve planted many over the years and no luck with them coming up. I thought it was the partial shade but yours are spectacular
(Hard to find a superlative to describe your garden)
I’ll have to try again. Anything special you do Linda?

Linda Brazill

Margaret Roach of the blog, A Way to Garden, just did a post about Martagons. Turns out I wasn't doing anything she said you should do.

My peach ones get at least half a day of sun and the red ones just some early morning sun. I think they are just planted in soil that drains well so they don't get waterlogged and rot.

Wish I could give you more help but I feel like my success is just luck. I will say that it did take a long time for them to do much. It may have taken them a couple of years to appear and then maybe a few more before they started to increase. Both of these groups are at least ten years old/

Kris P

Those are impressive clumps! They're lovely in bud and bloom. I wish I could grow them but my Sunset guide indicates I don't have a chance.

Lisa at Greenbow

Your martagons are a sensation in the garden. Every year I read about them I want to try them again. I don't seem to have the soil they like. What gorgeous plants and beautiful flowers.

Linda Brazill

Concentrate on your Lilies of the Nile/Agapanthus which I can't grow.

Linda Brazill

I think you are hotter and drier than here which would be an issue for them.

Nell

Guessing that the key to your martagon success is primarily drainage, along with reliable winter chill and relatively cool summer days and (particularly) nights.

With specially prepared beds and deer protection, they can be kept alive here, but we'd never get the satisfying multiplication that's happened in your garden. It's a big triumph here when lilies increase at all, even the tough Asiatics and L. regale. Thanks to timely caging, I enjoyed the first really good show from 'Sweet Surrender' in years. Over nearly a decade the original five bulbs have increased to, um, six. Yay.

Love that pale one, and looking forward to seeing it make its own patch in a few years!

ceci

I ordered 9 martagon bulbs after reading about yours last year and they came up and bloomed fabulously earlier this spring (maybe 6 or 8 weeks ago? I'm not a methodical record keeper. My one big surprise was how dainty the flowers are - I was envisioning a much larger flower! I found the sent lovely; not as spicy as some lilies.

ceci

Beth@PlantPostings

Wow, wow, wow. And we get to see them tomorrow. I can't wait. I might have to try them--especially if the rabbits won't eat them.

danger garden

So lovely, and your right, the color of the one against the tea house wall is perfection. I tried a few lilies maybe 3 or 4 years ago (not martagons) this year only one returned...and it’s about 10 feet tall. No blooms opening yet but there are a lot of buds.

Linda Brazill

I'm so glad they worked for you and that you liked them. I would have felt terrible if they turned out badly as they are expensive bulbs.

Linda Brazill

I have some other lilies that I have to stake and still can't get them to stay up very well. If they're happy, some of them are giants.

Erin

Once again I discover another plant gem on your blog. They are lovely. Thank you. Off to put it on the must-have list.

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